Malinois X Pictures

helloBARK! staff
By helloBARK! staff
Updated on January 23, 2020

Malinois X is a Belgian Malinois German Shepherd mix.

Belgian Malinois and German Shepherd dogs can easily be confused given their similar appearance.

However, German Shepherds are usually bulkier than the Belgian Malinois, who are compact and streamlined.

When you combine these two dogs, the result in a Malinois Shepherd mix.

Given the energy levels, intelligence and protective instincts of both parents, you can expect a Malinois X to embody those traits.

In this article, we’re going to take a look at some Malinois X pictures to give you a clearer idea of what this mix looks like.

What is an Malinois X?

The Malinois X is the result of breeding between a German Shepherd and a Belgian Malinois.

They can also be called Belgian Malinois German Shepherd mix. Given this is quite the mouthul, the name for this cross is usually shortened to Malinois X.

Other names for the hybrid dog breed include German Malinois and Shepinois.

Where do Malinois X come from?

The Malinois X is a fairly new crossbreed. It’s unclear when breeders started creating this mix intentionally.

Given the similarities between both Belgian Malinois and German Shepherds, it’s likely these dogs could have been crossed accidentally over the past 100 years or so.

As we mentioned above, the parent breeds share a lot of similarities. Both the Belgian Malinois and German Shepherd were bred to be excellent herding dogs.

The German Shepherd was created by an ex-German military capital Max von Stephanitz. He wanted to create the perfect working dog. In 1899, he bought the founding member of the breed Hektor Linksrhein at a dog show. A short time later, the Verein für Deutsche Schäferhunde (Society for the German Shepherd Dog) was created.

The breed suffered in popularity during the First and Second World Wars, even being renamed to the Alsation in the UK. However, their numbers increased in the second half of the 20th century. The American Kennel Club ranks them as the second most popular breed in the USA.

Belgian Malinois were one of four types of dogs bunched together in the Belgian Shepherd group. They were bred to be peerless herding dogs. The first Belgian Malinois arrived in the United States in 1911.

The importation of Malinois was temporarily halted during the Second World War. However, they played a big role in the war as military dogs. In fact, in modern society, Belgian Malinois are used in a variety of different roles, including police, military and guard dogs, as well as search and rescue dogs and blind eye dogs.

The AKC list the Belgian Malinois are the 43rd most popular breed in the US.

Malinois X Size

German Shepherds and Belgian Malinois aren’t too dissimilar in size so we can make a relatively confident guess about the height of Malinois X.

Belgian Malinois and German Shepherds will usually be between 22 to 26 inches tall. However, where weight is concerned, there’s a slight difference. Belgian Malinois will usually weigh between 40 and 80 pounds, while German Shepherds average between 50 and 90 pounds.

Malinois X Colors

When two breeds are mixed together, there’s no guarantee whether a cross will inherit certain desired traits from a specific parent.

Malinois X have a coat that reflects both breeds, so you can expect coloring such as black, brown, fawn, dark blue and white.

Their eyes should be brown with an almond shape, while their ears are likely to be erect to give an alert appearance.

They’ve usually got a double coat that sheds all year long and heavily during shedding season twice a year.

Malinois X Pictures

To give you a better idea of the Belgian Malinois German Shepherd mix, let’s take a look at some pictures of Malinois X dogs.

• Jacali (@jacalidog)

Jacali the Malinois X (Photo: @jacalidog / Instagram)

Jacali the Malinois X (Photo: @jacalidog / Instagram)

Jacali is such an outgoing dog. She loves people and dogs, and gets excited quite easily. She is very quick-witted and is sharp as a tack, so I always have to be one step ahead of her, but with constant training, she responds well to commands and corrections.

Jacali the Malinois X (Photo: @jacalidog / Instagram)

Jacali the Malinois X (Photo: @jacalidog / Instagram)

I believe many people think just because these dogs are known to be extremely smart and can be seen doing many tasks, such as police and military work, they don’t have to train them as much because they’re already smart. This is not true, in fact they require a lot of training to reach and maintain that level of obedience and receptiveness. Leaving them, or any kind of dog, in a backyard thinking they’ll run around and get their exercise is absolutely not effective, and they will not be properly exercised, because dogs need mental stimulation.

Jacali the Malinois X (Photo: @jacalidog / Instagram)

Jacali the Malinois X (Photo: @jacalidog / Instagram)

Whenever I’m out with Jacali, people love commenting on her sleek appearance and her coat. Many people will say they recognize the breed as used by the military. She loves people and people seem to love her. There have been times where people have commented on her body, saying she is too skinny. Jacali inherited more of the Malinois looks, and they have a very slender figure (which is why they are more highly desired than the GSD in terms of high-agility work), and many people think she is a skinny GSD. I think most people tend to over feed their dogs (and not work them out enough) resulting in a rounder figure, and they think this is the norm. However, it’s healthy for dogs to have a slender waist and have their muscles show through.

Jacali the Malinois X (Photo: @jacalidog / Instagram)

Jacali the Malinois X (Photo: @jacalidog / Instagram)

All intelligent dog breeds require a lot of stimulation, both mental and physical. This means switching it up and not being too repetitive too. With Jacali, I always use her meals as a reward, meaning I measure out her breakfast and I train her with it, using my hands to feed her like you would with treats. Then I let her chill out and give her time to digest her food, anywhere from 45 mins to an hour, then we either go out for a walk/play fetch/tug (all incorporated with obedience training) for about the same amount of time.

Jacali the Malinois X (Photo: @jacalidog / Instagram)

Jacali the Malinois X (Photo: @jacalidog / Instagram)

Malinois X Puppy Photos

• Jacali (@jacalidog)

Jacali the Malinois X (Photo: @jacalidog / Instagram)

Jacali the Malinois X (Photo: @jacalidog / Instagram)

I received word from someone in my area who knew of someone who needed to find homes for some GSDxMalinois pups. I never thought about getting a mix, but I’m not one of those people who care for “pure-bred” or “pedigree” dogs (just look at what they did to the GSD’s hips and hind legs from over and in-breeding… shame). In my eyes, a mixed dog is as valuable as any other dog, and seeing as the mix of these two breeds could make an overall healthier dog, I was inclined to take one in.

Jacali the Malinois X (Photo: @jacalidog / Instagram)

Jacali the Malinois X (Photo: @jacalidog / Instagram)

Malinois X to Follow on Instagram

If you want to learn more about the Malinois, you can always check out some examples of this mix breed on Instagram. Check out the following Malinois X:

• Jacali (@jacalidog)

Wrapping Up

So we’ve come to the end of our photo gallery of Malinois X.

A mix between a Belgian Malinois and a German Shepherd, Malinois X will usually have traits relating to both parents.