17 Best Dog Breeds For Indoors

helloBARK!
By helloBARK!
Updated on 31 October 2022

Are you looking to find the best dog breed for indoors?

If you’re thinking about getting a dog but you’re someone who loves spending time indoors, you’ll need a breed that fits your lifestyle.

While all dogs will need some exercise and a little mental stimulation, there are some breeds who are more couch potatoes than workers.

Alternatively, if you like to spend time indoors but you’re willing to exercise your dog multiple times a day, you could still get an active breed.

In this article, we spoke to a number of different experts, ranging from dog behaviorists and veterinarians to find out about the best dogs for life inside.

With the introduction complete, let’s take a look at the best dog breeds for indoors.

Xoloitzcuintli

Three Xoloitzcuintli dogs (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Three Xoloitzcuintli dogs (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Xoloitzcuintls are a medium sized dog and are considered hairless. Thus, they do not shed. They were bred by the Aztecs for their healing powers, so they have a calm and relaxed temperament.

Suggested by Karishma Warr, Head of Training & Behavior At Calm Canine Academy

Shih Tzu

Shih Tzu (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Shih Tzu (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Shih Tzus are great for indoors because of their small size and laid-back personality. They also don’t require a lot of exercises, making them perfect for apartments or smaller living spaces.

Suggested by Meg Marrs, Founder Of K9 Of Mine

Yorkshire Terrier

Yorkies are an excellent indoor breed. This pint-sized dog breed weighs about 7 lbs. on average, and it doesn’t require a ton of exercise.

However, Yorkies are an intelligent breed, so it helps to keep some puzzle toys and training aids on hand to stimulate them mentally.

Suggested by Daniel Caughill, Co-Founder At The Dog Tale

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (Photo: Adobe Stock)

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel has an adaptable and affectionate personality. You can say it is one of the most adaptable puppies in the canine world. This dog breed will easily adjust to your lifestyle. And if that means more cuddles under the blanket, they will happily accept it. Then, when you want to go outside, they will gladly follow you.

Easy to keep and train, this puppy is an ideal family dog or companion dog for an empty nester. Many describe him as the perfect lap dog, and that is a true statement to the core. As long as they are with their people, these puppies are up for anything.

Suggested by Aleksandar Mishkov, Editor In Chief At The Daily Tail

Bulldog

English Bulldog (Adobe Stock)

English Bulldog (Adobe Stock)

Not too big, not too small, this gentle breed is content to curl up next to you. They don’t require much grooming or exercise and prefer the perfectly cool climate of indoor life, especially in the summer.

Suggested by Erin Mastopietro, Founder Of Dope Dog

Greyhound

Two Greyhounds take a nap (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Two Greyhounds take a nap (Photo: Adobe Stock)

I know that most people think that Greyhounds are high-maintenance and high energy dogs, but that isn’t true. Most Greyhounds are happy with a forty-minute walk a day, and are basically homebodies who love nothing more than sharing sofa space with their favorite humans and curling up on a couch, and sleeping the day away. And as they’re medium-sized dogs, they won’t take up too much space in any home, regardless of how big or small said home is.

Suggested by Erika Barnes, Founder And CEO At Pet Smitten

Chinese Crested

Chinese crested dog in the summer in the park (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Chinese crested dog in the summer in the park (Photo: Adobe Stock)

A Chinese Crested is small and hairless. Their size and lack of shedding are perfect for indoors. The Chinese Crested as a toy breed that was often gifted from European Empires to Asian Dynasties. Thus, their temperament is generally very calm and obedient – perfect for the indoors.

Suggested by Karishma Warr, Head of Training & Behavior At Calm Canine Academy

Chihuahua

Long-haired Chihuahua (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Long-haired Chihuahua (Photo: Adobe Stock)

If I was absolutely forced to choose the best dog breed for indoors, I’d always choose a Chi-Chi. They’re loyal, tend to bond with one person strongly, and make great companion dogs.

They love to live the home life, don’t need a lot of exercise, and adore spending afternoons and evenings curled up on their owner’s laps in the comfort and style that they easily become accustomed to.

Suggested by Erika Barnes, Founder And CEO At Pet Smitten

Beagle

Beagles sits down after run with owner (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Beagles sits down after run with owner (Photo: Adobe Stock)

You might be surprised to find Beagle on the list of indoor dogs, but this scent hound puppy loves cuddles and staying inside as much as it loves sniffing. The big reason for that is they are agreeable. This dog will never get mad at you. Impossible to fault, Beagles tend to be very tolerant and accepting by nature.

They can live in a household with other animals, children, and pets. And because of its size and affectionate personality, the Beagle makes a popular family pet.

The big challenge is to train this dog because of its hunting instinct and high energy level. But if you motivate them with food, and allow them enough sniffing time, they are a joy. It is no wonder fans of the breed describe it as “merry”.

Suggested by Aleksandar Mishkov, Editor In Chief At The Daily Tail

Maltese

Maltese (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Maltese (Photo: Adobe Stock)

If you’re going to have a dog that stays mostly indoors, except for when you take them out to enjoy some fresh air and physical exercise, then you’re going to want a dog that is preferably low-energy, easy to maintain, and small to medium in size. If I had to recommend a single breed for indoor living, I’d choose the Maltese. These dogs are small and prefer to remain indoors, as they don’t do too well with different types of weather. They don’t need a lot of exercises, but they are playful and loving, ideal as apartment companions. They can also be easily trained to pee on a pad or tray, indoors.

Suggested by Jacquelyn Kennedy, Founder And CEO At PetDT

Pug

Fawn Pug stretches (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Fawn Pug stretches (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Pug’s frowny forehead, spherical communicatory eyes, and signature head tilt are merely irresistible. The pug-dog could be an affectionate and attentive breed. They need a wonderful temperament – some pugs might bark quite a bit, however, it’s all a small amount of fun, and they infrequently get angry.

Pugs are interested and invariably wish to search out what individuals do, which could be a sensitive issue as a result it keeps them busy so that they don’t get to exit that a lot.

Suggested by Steve Harris, Founder Of Daily Dog Stuff

Affenpinscher

Affenpinscher (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Affenpinscher (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Affenpinschers are great for indoors because they are small, do not shed, and only require a small of exercise – perfect for apartments. As dogs bred to be similar to terriers, they are easily exhausted with scent training and small bits of agility within the apartment.

Suggested by Karishma Warr, Head of Training & Behavior At Calm Canine Academy

Basset Hound

Basset Hound (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Basset Hound (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Loyal beyond belief, Basset Hound is one of the biggest couch potatoes you will find in the canine world. This puppy enjoys a low-key, indoor lifestyle as much as the next one. Yes, they belong to the hunting dog group, but over the years, they have accepted the domesticated lifestyle.

This puppy needs a daily walk, but once you get home, they are ready for a lazy snooze. You need just a single look at their sleepy eyes to be sure they love staying inside.

As fairly intelligent and loyal dogs, they are trainable, but can be a bit stubborn. The biggest challenge is their loud bark. But if you train them properly, you can easily handle the barking.

Basset Hounds are food-motivated because of their amazing sense of smell. This will help you with training.

Suggested by Aleksandar Mishkov, Editor In Chief At The Daily Tail

Cavoodle

Coffee the Cavoodle (Photo: coffeethecavoodle / Instagram)

Coffee the Cavoodle (Photo: coffeethecavoodle / Instagram)

There’s a reason the Cavoodle (also known as Cavapoo) is fast becoming one of the most popular dog breeds. A cross-breed between the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and Poodle, the Cavoodle takes the best of both worlds making it ideal for indoor living.

This isn’t to say they don’t need their fair share of exercise and entertainment. But they are great family dogs, highly trainable and eager to please. If they have poodle-type coats, they shed very little, making them ideal for indoor living.

Suggested by Melissa Smith, Former Dog Trainer, Canine Expert And Content Manager At Raw & Fresh

French Bulldog

French Bulldog (Photo: Adobe Stock)

French Bulldog (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Frenchies are much smaller than their cousins, the English or American Bulldog. French Bulldogs are a brachycephalic breed, which means they can’t run too far or too hard without difficulty breathing.

It also means they’re prone to overheating, which is why they tend to love the cool, air-conditioned indoors.

Suggested by Daniel Caughill, Co-Founder At The Dog Tale

Bichon Frise

Bichon Frise dogs running together (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Bichon Frise dogs running together (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Bichon Frises are another great indoor breed due to their affectionate and playful nature. They have low energy levels and are hypoallergenic, making them a great choice for families with allergies.

Suggested by Meg Marrs, Founder Of K9 Of Mine

Lhasa Apso

Lhasa Apso (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Lhasa Apso (Photo: Adobe Stock)

The Lhasa Apso is a calm and balanced companion dog. His small size allows him to perfectly tolerate an indoor lifestyle, provided, of course, that he takes a few daily walks. It is an ancient breed that appeared in Tibet, around the city of Lhasa, in the Buddhist monasteries.

Suggested by Remi Andrivet, Founder Of Dogs Planet

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