Cockapoo Pros And Cons

helloBARK! staff
By helloBARK! staff
Updated on February 04, 2020

Cockapoos are a cross breed that continue to soar in popularity.

They’re a cross between a miniature or toy Poodle and a Cocker Spaniel to create a hybrid dog that can make good family pets.

Cockapoos are popular with dog owners who are looking for a low shedding dog that is unlikely to trigger allergies.

However, as with all cross breeds, there’s no guarantee whether a Cockapoodle will inherits traits from their Poodle or Cocker Spaniel parent.

If you’re doing your research about these dogs, you’ll want to know the positives and negatives where the cross breed are concerned.

In this article, we’re going to look at some pros and cons for the Cockapoo cross breed, hearing from some Cockapoo owners to help us get an insight into the breed.

Cockapoo pros

Miss Darcy the Cockapoo (Photo: missdarcysadventures / Instagram)

Miss Darcy the Cockapoo (Photo: missdarcysadventures / Instagram)

Intelligent

As we mentioned above, there’s no guarantee whether a Cockapoo will inherit certain desired traits from their Poodle or Cocker Spaniel parent. The Poodle is generally recognised as one of the smartest dogs in the world. In fact, Stanley Coren wrote in his Intelligence of Dogs that Poodle are ranked second behind the Border Collie. The Cocker Spaniel is ranked 24th. Miss Darcy the Cockapoo told hellobark.com that Cockapoos are quick learners.

Great family pets

If you want a chirpy and upbeat dog, you won’t go too far wrong with a Cockapoo. They’re generally happy-go-lucky dogs. Cockapoos will benefit from regular training from a young age as well as socialization to expose them to new people, dogs and situations. They’re usually quick learners and eager to please with consistent training. Cockapoos will enjoy playing games or activities with the family given their high energy levels.

Let’s hear from Miss Darcy to learn a little more about Cockapoos:

Like every dog – it all depends on how the humans treat them. Treat them like family and they will be like family. They like human connection.

Devoted companions

Cockapoos can make great companion dogs that develop a deep and meaningful bond with their owners. They’re clever canines that are usually relatively quick to adapt to their new home and new owners once you’ve picked up your new Cockapoo. Often dubbed velcro dogs, you can expect your Cockapoo to follow your around the home and keep an eye on your wherever you go. Miss Darcy told hellobark.com that Cockapoos are “incredibly human” that love to build a deep human connection with their pet parent.

Don’t bark

Although Cockapoos are high energy dogs, this doesn’t translate to noisy dogs. Most Cockapoos aren’t big barkers, although each members of this cross breed is different. Usually, Cockapoos won’t bark unless they’re alerting their owner to a visitor at the door.

Here’s Miss Darcy’s owner May to give her insight into this trait:

It all depends on the dog and how they are brought up. Darcy is opinionated. She will tell off any dog she doesn’t like but on the whole she hardly barks. She barks at dogs she doesn’t like and sometimes she barks at certain neighbours she doesn’t like.

Hypoallergenic

There’s a fairly good chance if you’re researching Cockapoos, you’re doing so because you’ve already read that they’re considered hypoallergenic or they’re low-shedding pooches. The influence of the Poodle genes means they don’t shed as much as other dogs. The Poodle breed are also known for not producing as much dander. However, each Cockapoo is different. It all depends how much a Cockapoo reflects their Poodle parent in terms of coat type. While they usually won’t shed a lot, there’s no such thing as a completely hypoallergenic dog.

Cockapoo cons

Cockapoo plays in bluebells (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Cockapoo plays in bluebells (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Grooming

While they may be considered largely hypoallergenic, Cockapoos do have substantial grooming needs. You’ll need to give your Cockapoo a regular brush to ensure they don’t have debris or dirt caught in their coat. They’ll require a regular trim to keep their hair out of their eyes and ensure their curly coats aren’t dragging along the ground collecting dirt. You may feel comfortable doing this yourself but many Cockapoo owners will bring their dog to a professional groomer to carry out their grooming needs. If you don’t fulfill their grooming needs, you’ll find their coats can become matted.

Energetic

If you like to exercise, this could be a pro. But some Cockapoo owners seem to be taken aback by just how much exercise the cross breed need. They’re a high energy mix, which isn’t a surprise given their Cocker Spaniel and Poodle parents have been developed to be active, retrieving dogs. While Cockapoos can make great apartment dogs, they’ll still need daily exercise to get mental and physical stimulation. Wag Walking recommend at least 60 minutes of exercise a day. This could be regular walks, a run with their pet parent, trips to the dog park, agility or training sessions.

No guarantees

As with all cross breeds, there is no guarantee that a Cockapoo will inherit desired traits from their Cocker Spaniel or Poodle parent. Some dog lovers can be duped into believing that all Cockapoos will be hypoallergenic or non shedders. However, there are no guarantees that your Cockapoo won’t shed to some degree.

Big chewers

Some Cockapoos do have a reputation for being destructive chewers. This is a trait you’ll need to keep an eye out for from a young age. You can try to encourage your Cockapoo to stick to chewing their toys or treats such as bully sticks. You may find that a Cockapoo that isn’t getting enough exercise or mental stimulation will restort unwanted behaviours such as chewing out of boredom or frustration.

Separation anxiety

Separation anxiety is a chronic canine disorder that isn’t limited to one particular breed. It can affect any dog. Cockapoos can suffer from separation anxiety just like any other breed or mix. It’ll usually manifest itself as persistent barking, howling or whining, destructive chewing or digging or even defecating or urinating inside your home. If you’ve got a full-time job that means you’ll have to leave your Cockapoo at home alone for four to six hours a day, they may not be a good fit for your lifestyle. Alternatively, you could consider doggie day care, a dog walker or dog sitter.

Cockapoo HQ go to explain more:

Cockapoos are dogs that don’t respond well to suffering from spending too much time on their own. They are very prone to suffering from separation anxiety, as hinted at above.

Here’s Miss Darcy to shed light on her experience with this potential issue:

Yes, and it’s all down to training. The longest I have left her alone has been six hours. It was I who needed to be trained to not be anxious about leaving her.

Ear infections

Cockapoos are prone to ear infections just like any other type of dog. Their curly, long hair can lead to potential problems. As a Cockapoo owner, you’ll need to regularly check their ears to ensure they aren’t suffering with any potential problems. Cockapoos have what are called pendulous ears which require regular cleaning to prevent the build up of wax.

The Cockapoo Owners Club of UK list the following symptoms of ear infections:

• Tilting of head to one side
• Shaking of head
• Ear scratching
• Sensitivity when touching ear
• Swelling and redness
• Wax or browny discharge
• Strong odour
• Deafness or imbalance on walking/standing
• Hot to touch

In conclusion

We’ve reached the end of our Cockapoo pros and cons feature.

If you want to learn more about Cockapoos, we recommend reaching out to some breeders or even owners on Instagram to learn more about the cross breed.