Cavapoo Pros and Cons

helloBARK! staff
By helloBARK! staff
Updated on February 21, 2020

Cavapoos are a cross breed that are becoming increasingly popular.

They’re a mix between a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and a Poodle, creating an intelligent, energetic and upbeat mixed dog.

They can also be called Cavoodles or a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Poodle mix.

Cavapoos are popular for their hypoallergenic qualities and low-shedding coats, making them a potential option for dog lovers who want a pooch that won’t leave a trail of hair around their home.

However, as with all mixed breeds, there is no guarantee which traits a Cavapoo will inherit from their Cavalier and Poodle parent.

Having spoken to some Cavapoo owners on Instagram, we’ve created this feature looking at Cavapoo pros and cons.

Pros

Cavoodles Lily (Photo: lily_cute_cavoodle / Instagram)

Cavoodles Lily (Photo: lily_cute_cavoodle / Instagram)

Affectionate

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels have earned a reputation for being affectionate and loving dogs. They’ve acted as lap dogs for nobility and royalty throughout the centuries. Cavaliers are often dubbed companion dogs given the deep bond they develop with their pet parents. Cavapoos are also considered an excellent choice for dog lovers looking for a companion dog. They’ll usually inherit that loving side from both parents, but particularly the Cavalier genes.

Here’s Cooper the Cavapoo (@_instacoop) to shed more light:

I love Cooper’s temperament. He is so sweet and loving. Cooper can always tell when I need extra love or when it’s a good time to play. As long as we’re together, he’s happy!

Low/Non shedding

Perhaps the trait most commonly associated with the Cavapoo is their low shedding coats. They’re often branded hypoallergenic dogs. The American Kennel Club write that there’s no such thing as a completely hypoallergenic dog breed. However, some dog breeds and mixes are more hypoallergenic. The Poodle is one of the best-known hypoallergenic breeds. Therefore, a Cavapoo could inherit this low-shedding trait from their Poodle parent. However, there’s no guarantee a Cavapoo will inherit these desired Poodle genes.

Lily the Cavoodle says (@lily_cute_cavoodle):

Both my Cavoodles are non shedding. They leave no fur anywhere.

Cooper the Cavapoo (Photo: @_instacoop / Instagram)

Cooper the Cavapoo (Photo: @_instacoop / Instagram)

Cooper the Cavapoo adds:

The Poodle coat hardly ever sheds making Doodles a great choice for anyone with allergies.

Eager to please

Cavapoos tend to be eager to please. This is a trait perhaps more associated with the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel breed. They strive to make their pet owners happy. This can be a useful characteristic when it comes to training your Cavapoo. Poodles are the second-most intelligent dogs behind the Border Collie. So training your Cavapoo should be relatively simple. Having said that, it’s good practice to start puppy training from a young age to lay down a solid foundation.

Here’s Allie to give us an idea of her experience training Cooper:

Cooper has been very easy to train since he’s eager to please and quick to learn! I definitely was not the best at strict training, but somehow Cooper is an angel!

Good for first-time dog owners

If you’ve never owned a dog before, you may want to consider a Cavapoo. They’re a well-rounded canine with a lot of good traits. Their sweet nature, eagerness to please and low-shedding coats make them a good dog for those with limited experience. Although they’ve got a lot of pros, all dogs can come with their own unique set of challenges. You should carefully consider whether you’ve got the right set of circumstances to own a dog before contacting a breeder or rescue shelter.

Here’s Lily the Cavoodle with some advice for would-be Cavapoo owners:

A Cavoodle is for life. They cost money. Need regular grooming and indoor dogs. To make sure you have lots of time to spend with them, especially in the puppy stages, as they need training so they don’t pick up bad habits.

Cavapoo community

There’s a big Cavapoo community, especially in big cities such as New York, London and Sydney. Whether you live in a city with lots of other Cavapoos or you’re just on social media, you’ll quickly realise just how big and tight-nit the Cavapoo community is. This can be a big advantage if you need advice or help from other experienced Cavapoo owners.

Cons

Chessie King working out with her Cockapoo (Photo: Rover.com)

Chessie King working out with her Cockapoo (Photo: Rover.com)

Separation anxiety

Separation anxiety is a chronic canine disorder. It can affect all dogs irrespective of breed. However, some breeds do appear to suffer with separation anxiety more than others. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels have a reputation for being dogs that don’t do well when left alone for a long time. So this is something to consider if you’re weighing up whether to get a Cavapoo. Separation anxiety can manifest itself as persistent barking, howling or whining when you leave the home. Other symptoms include destructive chewing or digging, and in some extreme cases, defecating or urinating inside the home.

Alli has experienced some separation anxiety with Cooper:

I guess one thing we’re working through right now is that coopers developed a bit of separation anxiety when we’re a part. (Honestly so have I!!) I’m very lucky to have a job where I work from home, and Cooper’s an emotional support animal so he really goes most places with me. It’s rare that I have to leave him home alone, but when I do he usually just sits by the front door and cries a bit until I come back. It breaks my heart to watch him on my doggie-cam!

Proving again that all Cavapoos are different, Lily the Cavoodle and her sibling don’t suffer with this chronic canine disorder:

I leave mine alone the days I am at work. I watch them on my Furbo and most of the time now a days they are just sleeping. I would suggest leaving them alone from an early age so anxiety doesn’t develop. I have heard a lot of Cavoodles do get separation anxiety. Leave interactive toys to keep them entertained.

Exercise requirements

The amount of exercise a Cavapoo requires can depend on each individual dog. Poodles are high energy dogs given their ancestors were used to hunt ducks. Cavaliers are more laid back and require less exercise. So each Cavapoo could have different exercise requirements. Cooper and Lily are a case in point.

Here’s Lily’s opinion:

When they are young, I would say yes. They need exercise every day. Lily is 2.5 years old now and she is happy to walk 2nd daily if I can’t take her out. As a puppy she was a big chewer and did a bit of damage but with a face like hers all was forgiven.

But Cooper appears to have less exercise requirements:

Cooper needs a good 30 minutes of play time each day. Whether it’s a walk around the neighborhood or a “puppy play date”.

Cost of grooming

Although Cavapoos are relatively low-shedding dogs, they’ll still require effort and time where grooming is concerned. Most Cavapoo owners will try to stick to a regular grooming schedule, even daily, to precent tangles, knots and their dog’s hair becoming matted. Every four to six weeks, a trip to a professional groomer will be required to maintain the health and quality of their coat. This isn’t an inexpensive service.

Here’s some advice from Cooper:

I think that all depends on where you go. I’ve definitely found some groomers who want an unreasonable amount for grooming, but luckily I’ve found this small groomer in my area who is very reasonable!

Picky eaters

Again, all Cavapoos are different but there does seem to be a reasonable number of these designer dogs who are picky eaters. You’ll want to be sure that you’re feeding them a balanced and healthy diet. Pet owners who opt for recipe variety may have greater success. In our experience, we recommend trying a dog food delivery company. They cook complete and fresh meals using human-grade ingredients. You can read more about this here.

Expensive

Cavapoo puppy (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Cavapoo puppy (Photo: Adobe Stock)

Cavapoos aren’t cheap. You’ve got the initial cost of buying your puppy. A rough price range is $1600 (£1200) to $2000 (£1600) but you could see Cavapoo puppies advertised for more or less than this. You should be wary of breeders who charge a lot more for rare colors. Most responsible breeders are trying to breed for good and sound temperament rather than achieving a rare coat color. Once you’ve brought your puppy home, there are other costs to consider such as trips to the vet, pet insurance, dog food and grooming.